Grossness in Words with Friends

I didn’t mean to be gross in Words with Friends. Really I didn’t. But there it was–the gross word just staring at me with lots of points in its eyes. How could I resist?

The problem was that I would be playing this particular gross word against my darling daughter–the very one who taught me the disgusting word. I’m very sorry she ever had to know what the word meant, but she learned it on her very first job.

There it is–PARVO. Now it was great getting 70 points for that word, but I’m still sorry for the images I’m sure it dredged up in her mind. I don’t have the images because I’ve never had the displeasure of cleaning up after animals at the vet.

In case you don’t know, parvo is, according to the dictionary, “a highly contagious febrile virus disease of dogs that is spread especially by contact with infected feces, that is caused by a strain (Canine parvovirus) of the parvovirus causing panleukopenia in cats, and that is marked by loss of appetite, lethargy, often bloody diarrhea and vomiting, and sometimes death.”

All I know is that she would come home talking about that “bloody mess” she would have to clean up when she was at work. Yuk.

Therefore, I do apologize to my DD for throwing that awful word her way.

Oh, the outcome of the game is still unknown since it is in progress. Hopefully, I’ll win!



10 More Words the Teacher on Scrabble Thinks I Should Know

Scrabble 2

Image via Wikipedia

A couple of weeks ago I wrote my first blog about 10 words the teacher on Scrabble thinks I should know. You can read that here if you would like. Since that time, the teacher has given me many more suggestions, so I can see that this is going to turn into a serial blog. I won’t subject you to all of the words he suggests, just the ones that look interesting to me.

  1. azonic–Not confined to any particular zone or region–not local. Ok, I get that and can see that it may actually be useful. I guess if I were thinking about prefixes and suffixes, I would have guessed the meaning on this one.
  2. aliquant–This is a math term now rarely used–something about dividing. Don’t think I’ll find a use for this one in my vocab.
  3. icones–Best I can  tell this is Italian or Latin, probably for icon. Okay. I like this one because in this age of iPod, iPhone, iPad I’m always trying to play an iSomething word.
  4. olingo–Ha! I love this one–it’s a howler monkey! I thought it had something to do with linguistics. 😀
  5. xyst–A long narrow exercise area, or a garden path. The exercise thing was used mainly in winter or stormy weather for athletes to exercise in.
  6. vext–This just means vex–to trouble or baffle. Who knew this was a form of vex? Not me.
  7. gestic–An adjective related to body movements or gestures, especially dancing. I like this one very much, too.
  8. jeon–The chon of South Korea. Huh?
  9. epiboly–The growth of a rapidly dividing group of cells around a more slowly dividing group of cells. I’m hoping I don’t ever have to know or use this one.
  10. phui–Phooey! Fooey! Urban Dictionary says: a term used to show how stupid you are when said in random context. This one is my favorite of this list just because it’s fun to say!

So there you have it–10 more Scrabble teacher words. I’m increasing my vocabulary. Sorta.

215 Miles of Ironing

I was playing Qrank today (there’s an app for that) when an unbelievable stat popped up.

A woman will iron the equivalent of 215 miles in her lifetime.

WHAT? 215 miles of ironing??!! In whose world? Certainly not mine. I can assure you that I am going to come in waaaaaaay under that number in MY lifetime.

I do not iron. Well, on a rare occasion I will iron the wrinkles out of a pair of khaki pants, but I figure the invention of all these fabrics that can be washed and dried with no need to iron is a Godsend.

Why on earth would you buy something that requires ironing when a no-iron option is available?

This stat said the crazy ironing lady’s 215 miles will include clothes and other household items. Huh? Other household items? What is she ironing? Towels? Sheets? What? I can’t even imagine.

I truly don’t see the point in ironing most clothes unless you can stand up in your car until you reach your destination because your outfit is going to be all wrinkled by the time you get there anyway. I have heard tell of people hanging their outfits up and changing at a filling station right before they arrive at their destination, but I think that’s nuts.

Various antique irons.

Iron irons/Image via Wikipedia.

DH likes for his shirts to be crispy from 12 pounds of starch, but guess who presses them into that condition? Not me.

So, to those of you who are going to iron through 215 miles of fabric, iron on. I’m going to be doing something else.

10 Words the Teacher on Scrabble Thinks I Should Know

iPad Screenshots

Image by John Biehler via Flickr

Playing online Scrabble with the Scrabble app on my iPhone challenges my brain which is very good, and one reason I like to play is the teacher component. Lord have mercy that teacher face provokes a variety of emotions in me–anticipation, fear, dread, hope.

After I enter my word, I wonder what face I’ll get from the teacher. Sometimes it’s the flatline lip face. Sometimes it’s a smile. Sometimes I get the big smile with all the teeth. I like that one the most, of course. Then, there’s the dreaded horrified face! I’ve gotten that one a few times and it always makes me scared to put in my next word lest I draw that awful face again!

Sometimes I know the word he suggests, but most of the time I’m like, “What? Huh? Never heard of that one!” And I have a reasonably decent vocabulary.

Without further ado, here are 10 of the words the teacher has suggested recently.

  1. deodara—an East Indian cedar–Really? I’m supposed to have Indian vocabulary?
  2. booribi—not in the dictionary–Humph.
  3. roosing—chiefly dialect–Yes, I use this one all the time.
  4. ulema—plural in construction–Ummm, yeah.
  5. aas—associate in applied science, or many other abbreviations–I didn’t think abbreviations were allowed!
  6. intine—the inner coat of a spore–Yea, buddy, this English teacher knows that word!
  7. maqui—an evergreen shrub in Southern California–Well, being in Alabama, I’m not quite familiar with that particular shrub.
  8. equivoke—an equivocal term, a pun, double meaning–This one I may have to remember since I like it!
  9. viremia—the presence of a virus in the blood–Don’t want to remember this one.
  10. bawtie—in Scotland, a name for a dog, and sometimes a hare–I kinda like the way this one rolls off the tongue. 😀

I’m planning on doing this topic again because there are so many odd words suggested by the teacher. If my vocabulary were as good as his, I’d win every game!

I’m Going To Miss Books

Just Part of One Bookshelf

Really, I am. I am and have always been a book lover. Ask anybody. Ask my son and daughter who have spent hours impatiently waiting while I browsed dollar book sales. What you see on that bookshelf is just a small glimpse of the thousands of books that have passed through my hands.

I was walking through Sam’s Club today and I couldn’t help but observe that their book section is smaller than it was last year. “I’m going to miss books” was my thought as I passed by beckoning tomes. I’m acutely aware of why the tactile pleasure of flipping through books is slipping away from my hands.

The iPhone. The Kindle. The iPad. The Nook. iBooks. Kindle on the iPhone and iPad.

I will be the first to admit that reading a book in bed is much easier on my iPhone with iBooks. I can hold it with one hand. I don’t have to have a light on. I can adjust the backlight to my preference. I can make the text larger or smaller at will. I can look up any word instantly. What’s not to love?

Using the Kindle on my iPhone is almost as easy, but the only reason I ever choose it over iBooks is because they have a wider and larger book selection that iBooks.

I used to think a Kindle would be the very rankdom (a favorite term of my daddy’s), but the buttons are a pain in the patootie, and I have to have a light. It is awesome for reading on the beach, but that only happens once a year for me. The new Kindle with the touch screen has to be a great improvement.

All of these reading devices offer children’s books that are captivating since they will read to you and even animate themselves. I do love that advance in the technology, but what happens to the interaction of children and parents or grandchildren and grandparents when no human interaction is needed?

Little Golden Books

These Little Golden Books are favorites for several reasons. See the two on the right? My grandmother read those two copies to me. A Day at the Beach has always been my favorite. Mr. Meyer’s Cow was my oldest grandgirl’s favorite. Hansel and Gretel is my middle grandgirl’s favorite. And this version hasn’t been sanitized–the witch is still fattening Hansel up to eat him.

Oh, and as for A Day at the Beach, we always vacation at Alabama or Florida beaches in the summer. Therefore, I never really grasped the concept of spending a day at the beach. It is so blooming hot here in the summer that there is NO way to spend a whole day at the beach without dying of heat stroke. It’s more like a morning and evening at the beach with a midday retreat from the hotter-than-400-hells sun.

Then, several years ago I visited San Diego, California. Oceanside, CA, taught me what a day at the beach could be like. Really? I could stay at the beach all day long and not fry like a piece of bacon? I could sit in the sun without risking sun or heat stroke? I could get a golden tan instead of a dirty-looking tan? Oops, I digress.

Back to the books. I’m a tech lover at heart. I love gadgets with all my heart. I even love the wonderful world of book technology. But as much as I do, my heart will always belong to the physical hardback and paperback books. I’ll always prefer the smell of paper pages to plastic, metal, and glass devices.

An even if I did have a dust mite and parchment allergy problem like Niles Crane (which I don’t), I’d love books all the same.

I hope we don’t have to say goodbye anytime soon, but I suspect that within 10 years I’ll be having to explain to my great-grandchildren what those things are in the family photos.

My Current 10 Favorite iPhone Game Apps

Talking about my favorite iPhone game apps was on my agenda anyway, so when the postaday2011 topic came up today to review a product, the timing proved perfect to go ahead with it.

I like more than 10 game apps, but these are my current favorites:

  1. Angry Birds–I’ve been hooked on these flying fowl from the get-go. What can be more satisfying than smashing a bunch of smirking pigs?
  2. Angry Birds Seasons–I like the seasons version even better than the original. There are a few physics problems like things continuing to float even after I’ve knocked down all the supports, but I still love it.
  3. Angry Birds Rio–Of the three, I love this one the least, but it is still fun. I really don’t like the monkeys much, though.
  4. Bejeweled 2–I think Bejeweled Blitz on Facebook is more addicting with its one minute limit, but this one still sucks me into the time-wasting abyss.
  5. Qrank–I like this one because of the questions–Literature, Sports, Money and more. Some days I can blaze through them. Other days it’s like my brain has taken the day off.
  6. Bunny Shooter–Bunny Shooter makes me crazy. Trying to get the arrows at the right angle and shooting them at the right target in the right order can make me think more than some of the other games.
  7. Oven Break–This is a Christmas game app that is very fast-paced! I got it last year and still haven’t beaten it. My gingerbread man gets impaled on the spears quite frequently.
  8. Cut the Rope–Having to cut a rope so that candy falls into a frog’s mouth is more fun than you would think. I have one grandgirl who would list this one as her favorite.
  9. Stack the States–My current fav! This is one awesome app. I have learned more about size perspective of the states from this app than I ever knew in my life. The questions aren’t too hard for me, but they provide a good challenge for the grandgirls. Even the ones who can’t read yet play this because stacking the states up is so much fun.
  10. Stack the Countries–Also a current fav, but my skills at answering this one are pretty weak. It’s a big world, don’t cha know? Once again, it is fantastic for understanding the size perspective of countries. It’s amazing how tiny some are and how enormous others are.

I really love apps, and the game ones top my list. Words with Friends and Scrabble are actually my top two, but since I mentioned them the other day, I didn’t include them on this list.

I just looked at the app store, and it looks like Line Birds will make it onto my phone next. Any and all suggestions from you are appreciated!